Kakutani’s “Texts without Contexts”: Good, except it legitimizes Keen’s wrongheadedness

THESE NEW BOOKS share a concern with how digital media are reshaping our political and social landscape, molding art and entertainment, even affecting the methodology of scholarship and research. They examine the consequences of the fragmentation of data that the Web produces, as news articles, novels and record albums are broken down into bits and bytes; the growing emphasis on immediacy and real-time responses; the rising tide of data and information that permeates our lives; and the emphasis that blogging and partisan political Web sites place on subjectivity.

Michiko Kakutani’s review of books taking a critical look at Internet culture is good – but it showers way too much respect to Andrew Keen’s “Cult of the Amateur.”

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